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1951

Having been introduced to Adele Morales (by Daniel Wolf, a close friend) during a visit to New York City, Mailer separates from Bea in the winter, and begins living with Adele in New York, first at 85 Monroe Street (March through June), then in a sub-let at 409 East 64th Street (through mid-July), and finally […]

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51.5

“Norman Mailer.” American Novelists of Today, by Harry R. Warfel, 276. New York: American Book Co. Biographical entry containing Mailer’s 102-word statement on his plans for future work. He says, “I have no concerted program. I would like to experiment and to grow, but I pursue this aim through no particular standards. Technique must always […]

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51.4

“The Defence of the Compass.” In The Western Defences, edited by Sir John George Smyth, 134-44. London: Wingate. Essay on the prospect of a military collision between the state capitalism of Russia and the monopoly capitalism of the U.S., “the Colossi.” This version strongly echoes the arguments of Barbary Shore (51.1) and was obviously written […]

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51.3a

Letter to the Editor. Esquire, November. Mailer offers his support for the release of Ezra Pound from the psychiatric ward where he had been confined since 1945. Rpt: 14.3.

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51.3

“Authors and Humanism.” Humanist 11 (October-November), 201. Mailer answers the question “Are you a humanist?” by reference to Marx, Freud and his current atheism. Rpt: Humanist 41 (March-April 1981), 23.

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51.2

“Talk with Norman Mailer.” Interview by Harvey Breit. New York Times, 3 June, Sec. 7, p. 3. Important comment on the influence of Moby-Dick on The Naked and the Dead (48.2). Mailer says of 48.2: “I had Ahab in it, and I suppose the mountain was Moby Dick. Of course, I also think the book […]

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51.1

Barbary Shore. New York: Rinehart, 24 May; London: Cape, 21 January 1952. Novel, 312 pp., $3. The 1971 Cape hardcover edition and the 1973 softcover Panther edition (a Cape imprint) contains a “Note from the Author,” which consists of “Second Advertisement for Myself: Barbary Shore” (minus final sentence, with one other small change) from 59.13. […]

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