10.2

A Ticket to the Circus. By Norris Church Mailer. New York: Random House, 10 April 2010. Memoir by Mailer’s sixth wife, who he was married to for 27 years. Includes numerous remembered words from her husband, and several of his love letters to her. Rpt: 11.4, and SLNM (partial in both).

10-2

10.1

Mornings with Mailer: A Recollection of Friendship. By Dwayne Raymond. New York: HarperCollins, 26 January. Memoir of Mailer’s last days in Provincetown by his assistant from 2003 to Mailer’s death in 2007. Contains many quotations from Mailer and a detailed depiction of his domestic and professional life during his final years.

Mornings-with-Mailer-10.1

09.7

Loving Mailer. By Carole Mallory. Beverly Hills, CA: Phoenix Books. Memoir by Mailer’s lover from 1984-1991, with many remembered quotes from Mailer.

09.6

Lies My Mother Never Told Me. By Kaylie Jones. New York: William Morrow. Memoir by the daughter of James Jones. Contains important accounts of meetings with Mailer.

09-6

07.8

“My Friend Norman.” Memoir by Michael Lee. Hartford Courant, 21 January, G1, G8. Lee recalls how boxer-poet Eddie Bonetti introduced him to Mailer in the 1980s, and how they became friends. Mailer tells him that he wrestled with the narrative voice of The Castle in the Forest (07.10), and thought originally of having the Devil tell the story, but then ratcheted it down and gave the task to one of the Devil’s minions.

06.9

Love Bade Me Welcome: The Life of Phyllis Ott. By Phyllis Silverman Ott-Toltz and Barbara Bamberger Scott. Lake Forest, CA: Behler Publications. Memoir by the sister of Mailer’s first wife, Beatrice Silverman. “Sliver,” as she was called, was the roommate of Mailer’s sister at Radcliffe, and later had an affair with Mailer, which she discusses.

Love Bade Me Welcome

99.9a

Ex-Friends: Falling Out with Allen Ginsberg, Lionel and Diana Trilling, Lillian Hellman, Hannah Arendt, and Norman Mailer. By Norman Podhoretz. New York: Free Press, 1999. Memoir with long, bitter discussion of his broken friendship with Mailer, 178-220 and passim. See 68.4.

96.4

“Mailer and Me.” Memoir by Barry Leeds. Connecticut Review 18 (spring), 5-12. A long-time Mailer scholar remembers his meetings with Mailer over 30 years, and quotes from their wide-ranging conversations and correspondence. Rpt: A Moveable Beast: Scenes from My Life. By Barry Leeds. Bloomington, IN: AuthorHouse, 2014. Rpt: Norman Mailer Publication.

95.56b

Palimpsest: A Memoir. By Gore Vidal. New York: Random House. Vidal describes his first meeting with Mailer, and other encounters, here.

95.17a

“Guess Who Came to the 1967 Vietnam War Protest Dinner?” Memoir by Suzanne Fields. Insight, 15 May, 40. An account by the Washington hostess who put on “the liberal party” attended by Mailer, Lowell, Macdonald, Paul Goodman and several others before the events chronicled in The Armies of the Night (68.8), who describes herself as “the mess sergeant for the armies of the night.” She retells the story of the dinner she put on, and adds that Mailer did send her back a copy of the book he borrowed, his novel Why Are We In Vietnam? (67.15), with this inscription: “I guess you can’t dine out on tales of my misconduct forever.”