16.2

The Collision.” Mailer Review, 10-16. Unpublished short story about a hockey game, Mailer’s first complete short story, written in January 1933, shortly before his tenth birthday. Preceded by a facsimile of the original manuscript from the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas-Austin.

15.1

The Thalian Adventure.” Mailer Review, 8-26. Previously unpublished Mailer short story, written circa 1951. Preceded by a facsimile of the original manuscript from the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas-Austin.

14.1

La Petite Bourgeoise.” Mailer Review, 10-16. Previously unpublished short story written circa 1951. Preceded by a facsimile of the original manuscript from the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas-Austin.

13.3

“Love-Buds.” Mailer Review, 10-22. Previously unpublished short story written in Mailer’s senior year in college, 1942-43. Preceded by a facsimile of the original manuscript from the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin.

12.1

“The Blood of the Blunt.” Mailer Review, 9-27. Previously unpublished short story, circa 1951. Preceded by a facsimile of the original manuscript from the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin.

04.10

“Hemingway Challenge: 25 of Today’s Most Influential Writers Offer Original Fiction in 6 Words, No More, No Less.” Black Book, fall, 132-33. Mailer’s story: “Satan—Jehovah, fifteen rounds. A Draw.” The challenge is based on a 6-word piece by Hemingway: “For Sale. Baby Shoes. Never Used.”

95.56a

“Tolstoy and Chekov.” Paris Review 137 (winter), 48-49. Mailer recounts a story, perhaps apocryphal, of a conversation between the two great Russian writers.

84.35

The Last Night. New York: Targ Editions. Story, 31 pp., $100. No dedication. Limited edition of 250 copies. Rpt: From the December 1963 Esquire (63.39), with the incorrect notation that it appeared there in December 1962; 66.11, 67.11, 82.19.

68.32

A Selection from the Short Fiction of Norman Mailer, edited with notes by Iwao Iwamoto. Tokyo: Shohakusha, softcover, 88 pp. Unusual English language edition containing three stories set in Japan and the Philippines during and after WWII: “The Paper House,” “The Language of Men” and “The Dead Gook.” Rpt: 52.2, 52.3, 53.2, 59.13, 67.11, 82.19. See 74.19.

67.11

The Short Fiction of Norman Mailer. New York: Dell, 11 May, soft-cover; Sevenoaks, Kent: New English Library, August 1982. Short stories, 285 pp., 95¢.

The Short Fiction of Norman Mailer

The British edition combines 67.11 with Existential Errands (72.7) under the title The Essential Mailer (82.19). Nineteen previously published stories with an original introduction (later reprinted in 72.7 and 82.19). No dedication. Original title: “Hunger for Method, Greed for Gold.” Rpt: Accompanied by separate editions of Barbary Shore (51.1) and The Deer Park (55.4), The Short Fiction of Norman Mailer (80.23) appeared in a hardcover edition (the first) in 1980. New York: Howard Fertig. All 19 stories appeared previously in one or another of Mailer’s miscellanies (59.13, 63.37, 66.11); 13 of the stories appeared in periodicals or other collections prior to being reprinted in one of the miscellanies. “The Man Who Studied Yoga” and “The Time of Her Time” were reprinted in 98.7. Shohakusha (Tokyo) published A Selection from the Short Fiction of Norman Mailer (68.32). See 74.19.

Mailer:

It has been remarked that the short fiction of this author is neither splendid, unforgettable, nor distinguished, and I hasten hereby to join such consensus…. He does not have the gift to write great short stories, or perhaps even very good ones. In fact, he will confess he does not have the interest, the respect, or the proper awe. The short story bores him a little. He will admit he rarely reads them. He is, in secret, not fond of writers who work at short stories. Nor are they often, he suspects, fond of him. He has a private sneer for the reputations they have amassed. There is a terrible confession to make: he thinks the short story is relatively easy to write. (67.11)